bt7

aliciayolandamakes:

‘Record 2’ 2011
Ink drawing on cardboard from retail packaging
More from the Record series
eileenede:

Beata Chrzanowska
gotouyuuki:

cammmpo:

(via mi*lumia)

“米国では、いまだに、誰でも頑張ればいつかは成功できるという「アメリカンドリーム」の神話が根強い。以前、知り合いの米男性知識人に、米国は理想と現実で成り立っている国だと言ったら、「たとえ数パーセントでも希望があるかぎり、米国人は夢を見続ける」と反論され、たじろいたことがある”

【注目記事】アメリカにおける「超格差社会」の実態 - 暗黒夜考〜崩壊しつつある日本を考える〜

bbww:

This is what we made in Hyères…. along with a book full of adventures.


Caracal Lynx & Baby in London Zoo 1965

The caracal (Caracal caracal) is a fiercely territorial medium-sized cat ranging over Western Asia, South Asia and Africa.
The word caracal comes from the Turkish word “karakulak”, meaning “black ear”. In North India and Pakistan, the caracal is locally known as syahgosh (स्याहगोष/سیاه گوش) or shyahgosh, which is a Persian term meaning black ears.  In Afrikaans it is called Rooikat, “red cat”.[5]
Although it has traditionally had the alternative names Persian Lynx, Egyptian Lynx and African Lynx, it is no longer considered to be an actual lynx. Instead, it is now believed to be closely related to the African golden cat and the serval.  The caracal is classified as a small cat, yet is amongst the heaviest  of all small cats, as well as the quickest, being nearly as fast as the serval.
The colour of the fur varies between wine-red, grey, or sand-coloured. Melanistic (black) caracals also occur. Young caracals bear reddish spots on the underside; adults do not have  markings except for black spots above the eyes and small white patches  around the eyes and nose. Underparts of chin and body are white, and a  narrow black line runs from the corner of the eye to the nose.
The pupils of a caracal’s eyes contract to form circles rather than the slits found in most small cats. The most conspicuous feature of the caracal is elongated, tufted black ears, which also explain the origin of its name, karakulak, Turkish for “black ear”. A juvenile has black on the outside of the ears, which disappears as it becomes an adult. Its ears, which it uses to locate prey, are controlled by 29 different muscles.
collagecollegiate:

A. Alena
ssdmmfr:

Artist:
Paul W. Ruiz
“Saltimbanque II”2008Oil On Linen20 x 15 cm
mindbabies:

danielholter:

rogerrogue:

THE IMMORTAL (by Nick Gentry)

Wow.

 My nieces don’t know what these things are. :(